1. mcnarris:

x
    Reblogged from: mcnarris
  2. golftraveller57:

(only) two famous bunkers are between you and the green
     @ the Old Course St. Andrews, 11th hole par 3
          the huge “Shell” bunker here in front and the small but deep
          potbunker “Strath” just at the green

    golftraveller57:

    (only) two famous bunkers are between you and the green

         @ the Old Course St. Andrews, 11th hole par 3

              the huge “Shell” bunker here in front and the small but deep

              potbunker “Strath” just at the green

    Reblogged from: golftraveller57
  3. bunkershotgolf:

    The 2014 Ryder Cup Winning Moment

    Reblogged from: bunkershotgolf
  4. Metrics Beyond Revenue

    New post on business!

    When you’re dealing with sales, it may become easy to get obsessed with revenue. Afterall, it’s a great indicator of how a sales representative is contributing to the company as a whole, and is probably the most visible metric on paper. Revenue hold a lot of weight when considering how to better optimize work activity, or boosting a company’s confidence overall. However, it is equally as important to remember that sometimes, cash does not rule everything around us. We must be focused on other metrics that feed into revenue. These particular metrics are not esoteric or hard to understand. In fact, Entrepreneur’s William Tyree has identified and analyzed each particular one, revealing not only why it’s important, but how it contributes to the company as a whole.

    1) Lead-Response Time: This is seemingly a no-brainer, but shrouded in mystery. After all, we can generally agree that it is a good thing for sales reps to respond to prospects, but it may be hard to put a finger on why it’s a good thing. A few years ago, Harvard Business Review ran a story on a Harvard-conducted story that focused on lead-response time. The study revealed that sales reps who reached out to the prospect within one hour of obtaining the lead were seven times more likely to have a meaningful conversation.

    2) Rate of Contact: It’s more than worth it to watch the rate of outgoing calls to opportunities. Just because a sales rep is reeling off call after call, doesn’t mean they are being particularly productive. If the volume of calls is particularly high, yet generated opportunity is low, there may be something wrong with their sales pitch.

    3) Follow-up: Studies show that almost 50% of sales reps are not following up on those leads. This is huge, because more initiated follow-up calls that are correlated with higher rate of closed sales.

    4) Embedded Links: It’s a good idea to have links in follow-up emails to engage the prospect on another level. Using links in this way ensures that the sales rep is tailoring the message or pitch to the prospect. So, it definitely bodes well to take a peek at some of those emails, and give the reps a heads up if links or other multi-media content is being underutilized, if at all.

    5) Social Media Usage: Ok, this one can get a little bit murky. The best sales reps use Linkedin, and there is definitely a correlation between social media output and direct revenue. However, it’s currently unknown exactly what kind of contact is being put out there, and how much contact is being made.

    6) Usage Rate of Marketing Collateral: An interesting metric, this is. When you’re pitching a sale to a prospect, tons of content can be generated just to close that sale. Some of the material is beneficial, and some isn’t. Lot’s of it goes unused, too, so just think of all the opportunities made possible by their availability. Tyree suggests using unique call tracking numbers on that content, so you can see if calls are being returned after they go out.

    7) Opportunity-Win Ratio: Super important, this metric is vital to dividing tasks amongst reps. Keep a close eye on how many reps who get a foot in the door, actually close. Or, how many reps struggle with the opportunity phase, but nail the closer. By keeping track of this, you should be able to adjust tasks accordingly.

    from Justin Hughes http://ift.tt/1xpRs7I


  5. Dealing with Frustration

    New post on business!

    In the business world, sometimes we find ourselves with odds at allies, clients, co-workers, management… the list really goes on. People can be frustrating, and there’s no real way to avoid that ever-present fact of life. It’s unrealistic to expect everyone to have the same methods and practices, the same motivators, or even the same objectives. And so, inevitably, we may begin to feel that frustration rise within us. But what’s important to know is how to deal with the frustrations we feel. For example, if we self-destruct and spew vitriol at the frustrating roadblock, is that really getting us anywhere? What’s the point? Fine, maybe that yelling is cathartic, but what’s really the gain from that?

    Writing for Inc.com, Kevin Duham explores that very topic. In his post, he shares with us several secrets he has to dealing with frustrating “roadblocks” that inevitably appear in the business world. Check ‘em out below.

    1) Theres a reason. Find it: Duham reminds us that people are usually being a roadblock for a reason. Sure, some people may get a juvenile kick out of playing devil’s advocate or opposing your every suggestion. No question, those people can be a handful. But most of us are rational by nature, and so when we find ourselves at odds with someone, it is more often than not for an actual reason. Your situation may well be easier if you can figure out what’s going on from there end.

    2) A common tongue makes things easier: This could be an issue of semantics, or the nature of your communication in general. If you’re using complex jargon in order to describe a situation to someone who doesn’t have a fundamental grasp of the terminology, you can understand why your working relationship may be so frustrating. Try to find a level mode of communication, that both parties can easily understand or access.

    3) Give the people what they want: Now this is just basic negotiation. Often times, the roadblock just wants something. The goal is to figure out what it is? Creative reign? A new opportunity? More involvement or responsibility? Once you find out what they want, lay out the terms under which you’re willing to meet them. If you can’t give them what they want, its best to suggest a compromise.

    4) Make sure they’re just that into you: When the person on the other side of the table has no investment in your well-being whatsoever, it’s pretty easy for them to remain contentious. But if you work to build a positive relationship, you may see some payoff. Work towards it, show them you just aren’t made for work, display some empathy.

    from Justin Hughes http://ift.tt/1t2tQ2g


  6. Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur

    New post on business!

    With recent changes in government and economy, entrepreneurship has certainly been on the rise over the past few years. Individuals want to take responsibility for their own income, and create their own successes. Recent college graduates are jumping at the chance to start their own businesses, and business professionals with successful careers in other industries are quitting their jobs and becoming their own bosses. It is an obvious, and increasing trend. And why not? Entrepreneurism is amazing because it does not discriminate against sex, age, race, education, etc.; however there are certain characteristics a good entrepreneur should always embody. Check them out below!

    1. Attainment: A good entrepreneur should demonstrate his or her ability to achieve goals, big or small, that they have set and organized a head of time.
    2. Sales: A steady or increasing rate of sales that encourage investors to invest in the company, and allow the entrepreneur to make money. There is nothing worse than investing your entire life’s savings into a company, and never making it back!
    3. Tenacity:  The entrepreneur’s unwavering in your belief in his or her company/product, and the determination to make it a success.
    4. Leadership: The ability to lead a team on micro and macro levels, and gain trust and respect from all team members.
    5. Introspection: A self-awareness and willingness to adjust thought processes and work procedures to make the company and product better.
    6. Networking: A good entrepreneur will have a  large network of people to connect with who will possibly invest, support, or spread the word about the product or business. He or she will always spend time traveling and spreading the word about the company to make new connections.
    7. Handling Failure: There will inevitably be failure when embarking on a new project that no one has ever heard of before. A good entrepreneur should be able to use failures productively to create a better product.
    8. Bootstrapping: The ability to create something successful and noteworthy from limited resources.
    9. Customer Service: A certain charisma that will get customers excited about/willing to use a new product or engage with a new company.

    from Justin Hughes http://ift.tt/1t2tPLG


  7. Powhatan

    Check out my new post on Virginia culture and History!

    In the last post on Virginia history, we took a crack at condensing the state’s past into a linear, teleological tunnel- a difficult task to be sure. One of the larger focuses of the post was on the different language tribes across the land that is now Virginia. Remember how people organized themselves according to language families? And how one of the people from one of those language families, the Algonquin, organized themselves into a confederacy called the Powhatan? Well, this post is all about the Powhatan.

    The Powhatan confederacy can trace it’s origins (in terms of time, at least) to the late 1500’s. At this time, a man called Wahunsenacawh (Chief Powhatan), consolidated 30 tribes of the language family into one powerful confederacy. The consolidation of power was rapid; with the first seeds of a unified political and military confederacy being sewn, Chief Powhatan had inherited the control of only about six tribes. However, by the time the settlers first came in the early 17th century, that number increased to 30. The people who were part of these separate tribes mainly inhabited the eastern parts of present-day Virginia and what is now Western Maryland, but they were all allied under Chief Powhatan, and it was to him that they paid tribute. Think of it like a parent company with independently operated subsidiaries. Keep in mind that the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown was founded in 1607, so the two histories are closely intertwined.

    Perhaps the colonists had hoped for peaceful and economically productive relations with the colonists; whether they did or did not, violence took hold early on in their interactions. After some skirmishes, a very brief and even tenuous peace came about with the capture of Wahunsenacawh’s niece, Pocahontas. She was married to planter John Rolfe and converted to Christianity, but within a few years both she and her uncle, the Chief, were dead. After Chief Powhatan Wahunsenacawh’s  death in the early 17th century, his brother, Opechancanough (and Pocahontas’s father) took up the role as chief.

    Predictably, by the time Opechancanough ascended to the role as chief, tensions with the English settlers were higher than ever. This result in several notable clashes with the English, which were in turn met with violence in a series of events known as the Anglo-Powhatan Wars. However, introduced diseases wrought havoc on the American Indigenous peoples, including the Powhatan. Opechancanough was captured, and killed while still a prisoner. Ultimately, a treaty was signed that gave the English a permanent slice of Virginia, between the rivers York and Blackwater. Also a consequence of the treaty was the effective dissolution of the Powhatan confederacy.

    Even today, we must always be mindful of the blood on which our national histories have been built.

    from Justin David Hughes Virginia http://ift.tt/1pkAtzJ


  8. Attracting Millennial Talent

    New post on business!

    Another crop of recent graduates (congrats, class of 2014), and another crop of job applicants. Now, I know some of you may dislike the term “millennials”- but really, is Gen Y a better one?- but really, there are a few things worth noting about this young demographic that would do more than a few employers and business well to keep in mind.

    These kids are no longer kids. They were born at the tail end of the Cold War, if not after it’s end. They came up in an era that saw, among other things, the United States as the sole global superpower. Millennials saw communication and interconnectivity expand at a near unprecedented pace: the .com bubble, personal computers becoming commonplace in homes; mobile devices, pagers, beepers- you name it. But they’ve also seen 9/11, the resulting post 9/11 world, the volatile nature of national politics, and over a decade of armed conflict abroad. Basically, American millennials have seen their home country, the U.S., at unprecedented highs and lows.

    Which means that their attitudes and expectations are similarly affected. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out what’s so different about these twenty-somethings; why they can be so deeply cynical yet wonderfully nostalgic for their days of youth. Basically something’s going on, and as they enter the workforce, too many employers aren’t really grasping why. CNN Money (Fortune+Money) contributor Anne Fisher has provided some tips that current employers should remember during this newest wave of applications. Check out a few of them below.

    For starters, one of the best things that can be done is to talk about the ways in which the company can be used as a platform for future opportunities. Many young people are mentally geared to thinking about the future, so factors such as corporate stability and culture are far less interesting in the interview room. This might seem selfish at first, but remember that this is as much an opportunity for you as it is for them. They want to work for you, and you want their talent. It’s equally the part of the employer to sell the company as it is for the prospective employee to sell their skills. Just stick to selling points that matter to them.

    On that note, the traditional job interview itself may be dying. A quick look at the data reveals that the companies offering entry level jobs that are getting the most accepted offers are shying away from in-house interviews, opting instead for meetings in more casual environments, like cafés.

    from Justin David Hughes http://ift.tt/1to640Z


  9. Another crop of recent graduates (congrats, class of 2014), and another crop of job applicants. Now, I know some of you may dislike the term “millennials”- but really, is Gen Y a better one?- but really, there are a few things worth noting about this young demographic that would do more than a few employers and business well to keep in mind.

    These kids are no longer kids. They were born at the tail end of the Cold War, if not after it’s end. They came up in an era that saw, among other things, the United States as the sole global superpower. Millennials saw communication and interconnectivity expand at a near unprecedented pace: the .com bubble, personal computers becoming commonplace in homes; mobile devices, pagers, beepers- you name it. But they’ve also seen 9/11, the resulting post 9/11 world, the volatile nature of national politics, and over a decade of armed conflict abroad. Basically, American millennials have seen their home country, the U.S., at unprecedented highs and lows.

    Which means that their attitudes and expectations are similarly affected. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out what’s so different about these twenty-somethings; why they can be so deeply cynical yet wonderfully nostalgic for their days of youth. Basically something’s going on, and as they enter the workforce, too many employers aren’t really grasping why. CNN Money (Fortune+Money) contributor Anne Fisher has provided some tips that current employers should remember during this newest wave of applications. Check out a few of them below.

    For starters, one of the best things that can be done is to talk about the ways in which the company can be used as a platform for future opportunities. Many young people are mentally geared to thinking about the future, so factors such as corporate stability and culture are far less interesting in the interview room. This might seem selfish at first, but remember that this is as much an opportunity for you as it is for them. They want to work for you, and you want their talent. It’s equally the part of the employer to sell the company as it is for the prospective employee to sell their skills. Just stick to selling points that matter to them.

    On that note, the traditional job interview itself may be dying. A quick look at the data reveals that the companies offering entry level jobs that are getting the most accepted offers are shying away from in-house interviews, opting instead for meetings in more casual environments, like cafés.



    via Justin David Hughes http://ift.tt/1to640Z
  10. Good Workout Food

    Thanks for checking out my latest post on fitness!

    Just as important as remaining physically active, fit, and balanced with a wide variety of efficient and effective exercises, is maintaining a healthy synchronicity with your diet. This means not only doing exercises and engaging with activities that push you, but maintaining a steady supply of nutrients to make such physical work possible. In fact, constant exercise compliment by a terrible choice in foods can pretty much negate the effects that a strong workout may have. The term “super foods” is a bit misleading sometimes, but its definitely true that some foods provide certain benefits that others do not. Thankfully, over at (of all place) MSN HIM, contributor Tom Fontaine has marked up the best fitness foods for men. Check out some of the foods below, and read more about them and their respective nutritional qualities here.

    • Spinach: Green, leafy, and (especially when prepared right), absolutely tasty; spinach consumption has been shown to really up protein absorption, which means muscles can better repair after tough workouts. It’s also a great choice if you’re seeking something with anti-inflammatory benefits. While we can easily tell if that terrible rash is becoming quickly inflamed, it’s a bit harder to tell the same with internal tissues. So be sure to eat up- it’s particularly delicious when sautéed.
    • Turkey: We all know that piling on the protein is beneficial when we’re trying to get into peak physical condition, but try opting out for turkey instead of gunning for the more standard chicken or fish. Not that anything is wrong with them, but turkey is too often relegated to the accoutrements of Thanksgiving and other holiday meals. Turkey is amazing, and pretty inexpensive to boot.
    • Porridge/Oatmeal: I gotta say, sometimes I take a bit of an issue with cold cereal. It’s a grain option of two extremes. Sometimes it’s too sweet, which is obviously not what a breakfast should be. On the other hand, it can sometimes taste like… nothing. Or worse, it could be rather nutrient-thin. A hearty cup of oats, though can stick with you all morning. And this is all before mentioning how it’s a great contributor of slow release energy, and excellent for heart health with properties that have been shown to reduce cholesterol and reduce heart disease. It’s also a brain food, as it promotes the release of serotonin, a neurotransmitter which is literally responsible for making you feel good.

    from Justin David Hughes http://ift.tt/1nCNq62


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